How Much Pawn Shops Pay for TVs

February 16, 2020 - Electronics

Pawn shop TV prices vary by year as new TV models are released.

As new TVs are released into the market, the value of previous TV generations and models decrease. This can make the prices vary greatly by brand.

Refer to our list of 2020 pawn shop TV prices below to learn how much pawn shops pay for TVs by each brand.

You might be asking yourself how we have access to this price data.

PawnGuru facilitates introductions between pawn customers and pawn shops looking to buy particular items of value, so we have a lot of data on actual prices that pawn shops pay for TVs. Please keep in mind that these are rough values, as there are many different models of TVs (as well as differences in condition quality) that are factored into this data.

The minimum, maximum and average offers are based on PawnGuru’s data set from 2020 of all offers made on TVs by pawn shops across the United States.

Pawn Shop TV Prices by Brand (2020)

 

Brand

Minimum Offer

Maximum Offer

Average Offer

Sharp

$25

$375

$131.01

Samsung

$1

$1000

$166.31

Sony

$10

$750

$137.73

LG

$1

$700

$123.42

Vizio

$1

$300

$78.60

Hisense

$20

$250

$99.42

Panasonic

$1

$100

$34.83

Insignia

$15

$150

$60.17

Toshiba

$10

$200

$80.76

Philips

$10

$125

$66.25

JVC

$25

$75

$48.33

Apple

$10

$90

$45.13

Now that you know how much pawn shops pay for TVs, get ready to learn how to pawn a TV!

How to Pawn a TV

It’s simple, and you don’t need to be an expert at pawning or negotiating. You just need to know the tools you have at your disposal and the basic process involved.

Here’s how to pawn a TV:

  1. List your TV online at PawnGuru (free and takes only a couple of minutes!)
  2. Receive offers for your TV almost instantly
  3. Compare your offers and choose the best one
  4. Enter the highest bidding pawn shop with your TV
  5. Get the final appraisal
  6. Walk out with cash in hand

Related reading:

David Stiebel

David Stiebel is one of the cofounders of PawnGuru. David was educated at MIT, where he studied Math. He subsequently worked at Bain as a data scientist before starting PawnGuru in 2015. He started PawnGuru to build a better tool for pawn shops and consumers to connect.

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